Toddler Care After Breast Augmentation

If you’ve just undergone a breast augmentation in Madison, Wisconsin with body recontouring surgeon Dr. Thomas Bartell, you know that recovery will take some time. Your toddler, however, is probably less understanding. She will want to maintain her normal routine of snacks, playing, and adventuring despite how you’re feeling. Unfortunately, many of these activities require lifting your child. And if you’ve had a breast augmentation, you know that you need to restrict your lifting to nothing heavier than eight pounds for six weeks, as well as avoiding lifting your arms above shoulder height for the first week or two. So to help keep both you and your little one happy during your recovery, we’ve compiled some handy tips for toddler care after breast augmentation. 

Toddler Care Tips After Breast Augmentation

  • Invest in Toddler Steps
  • Create a Low-Level Change Table
  • Lift-free Snuggles

Invest in Toddler Steps

Toddlers need help getting pretty much wherever they need to go. (Except into the pantry, they seem to be able to do that just fine!) The crib, high chair, sink, and car seat all usually require an adult to lift them in. During your prolonged lifting restriction, we heartily recommend finding a good set of toddler steps to help eliminate the strain of constant lifting. 

For standing at the kitchen counter, bathroom sink, or even to climb up into the crib, you could consider getting a study toddler tower. If using near a crib, guide your child up and over without lifting her. Be sure to move away from the crib afterward so your child doesn’t try to climb out herself. 

Another option for the crib is simply to transition your child to a toddler bed before your surgery so that she can get in and out by herself.

A smaller, lightweight step stool like this is great for moving between rooms or keeping in the car. When it’s time for your child to get into his carseat, place the step on the ground so he can get into the car on his own. Then, move the step inside the car below his carseat so that he can climb into his seat without being lifted in. 

Create a Low-Level Change Table

It’s a wise idea to limit non-essential activities during your recovery. Unfortunately, diaper changes don’t fall into that category! Make the frequent diaper changes easier on your body by creating a temporary changing station that doesn’t require lifting.

Place a changing pad in the corner of the room or on a couch that your child can climb onto by herself. Keep wipes, trash bags, ointment, and other necessities in a bathroom organizer nearby. Having a convenient place to clean your child without lifting will prevent unnecessary stress to your chest.

Lift-free Snuggles

The hardest part of not lifting a toddler is when he needs you to snuggle or comfort him. Have a lift-free plan in place for when your child needs cheering up. Keep his favorite blanket and some books near a comfy chair. If your child asks to be held, take him by the hand to the chair. Let him climb up himself and crawl into your lap or beside you. 

Safely seated, you can give him all the gentle snuggles he needs. Show him how he can snuggle into your arm or place his head on your lap if your chest is sore. Reading books, singing, finger songs (without raising your arms too high), and watching favorite shows together can all happen without picking him up. And it won’t be long before both of you are back to your normal routine.

Breast Augmentation in Madison, Wisconsin

Being patient and following your doctor’s post-surgery instructions are essential for optimal healing. Rushing the recovery process can result in injury or shifted implants. With some planning, you can have a good post-surgery experience even while caring for your little one(s).

See real before-and-after photos of Dr. Bartell’s results, If you are interested in breast augmentation or other below-the-neck procedures like tummy tucks or liposuction, book your consultation today. Dr. Thomas Bartell specializes in breast augmentation leaving NO scars on the chest wall in Madison, Wisconsin.